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Post-Op LASIK Stories

Post-Op LASIK Stories

By Joel Hunter, MD

Of all the questions that we had the Hunter Vision team put together for possible blog ideas, (Again, this was to keep me from only telling stories about how well my three-year-old can dance and focus this blog on vision correction.), the one that seems like the most fun to write about is today’s. “Tell some fun post op patient stories.” Granted, that’s a bit more imperative than interrogative, but pointing out things like that is one of the reasons I get invited to very few parties.

There is a guy that goes to my church who may be one of the best people I know. He is kind, hilarious, an excellent writer, and a genuinely caring human being. Whether it is part of what shaped him into a great man, or that he was able to accomplish all this in spite of it, he also has cerebral palsy. As a guy that was blind without his glasses, it meant he had to ask people to help him with his glasses when he needed them cleaned or adjusted. Think about how often that is. Glasses are annoying, aren’t they? Anyway, with a lot of patience on his side and some time on our side, he was able to get ASA (which is like PRK, which is a type of laser vision correction) and now he sees 20/20. It is wonderful for two reasons: first, no way could older laser technology have been able to help this great man, and second, he’s a man that has one less thing to worry about. I still see him almost every week, and now him not having glasses is just normal. It is beautiful.

A college student came to see us and it was a normal exam except that his glasses were just terrible. They looked like movie prop glasses, and his vision wasn’t even good with them. The next morning after 3D LASIK, I got an iChat (That’s how our office communicates.) in my office that said, “Mike (made up name) is VERY happy!” And it turns out it was a tremendous understatement. I am convinced that some people have a greater capacity for joy than others, and they are some of my favorite people to meet. As I greeted him in the lobby for his LASIK post op appointment, he was shouting (in a not scary way), “HAHAHA!! Look at that TV! Look out this window! HAHA! I can see all the cars! OHHH man! AHAHAHAHA!” He may have won the Best Next Day Post-LASIK Reaction Award. I still talk about him.

Maybe just one more, since this is more words than I thought it would be. A captain for the SWAT team, a man who was a lifelong sniper and was armed at every visit, had 3D LASIK here a few months ago. I get a little uptight around police officers just because I used to only see them when I was speeding (which is almost NEVER if you are reading this, police officers whom I deeply respect), and this man made me more nervous than usual. He is a colossus of a man. In a different setting, he looks like someone that would kick over my sandcastle at the beach. He was super nice, but super intimidating. The next day, he was over-the-moon happy, and told me really clearly in four letter words. I was relieved. He told me I could do a ride-along on a dangerous mission if I wanted, and I actually really do, in a terrified, nauseated kind of way.

I thought I would get to write more than that, but apparently I’m more verbose on paper than in person. Three is enough. Everyone is so different that it’d be a novel to go through it all. That’s what makes LASIK so fun. A thousand people will react to a precious gift in a thousand different ways. They will all react to a terrible gift the same way. “Socks? Thanks, I guess.”

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These articles are brought to you by Hunter Vision. We help people in Orlando discover life after glasses and contacts.
 
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